Honolulu Personal Injury Attorney - Law Office of William H. Lawson

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Honolulu Car Accident Attorneys William H. Lawson and Amy L. Woodward


Here at Accident Lawyer Honolulu, we are committed to helping those who have been victims of serious injuries rebuild their lives. Honolulu Injury Attorneys William H. Lawson and Amy L. Woodward, experienced lawyers based in Honolulu, Hawaii, concentrate in serious personal injury and death claims and together have over forty years of experience in the field. Mr. Lawson and Ms. Woodward help clients and/or their families recover after serious personal injury. Mr. Lawson has been voted one of the best personal injury attorneys in Hawaii by both his clients and his peers. He has top marks from Martindale Hubbell (AV preeminent), Lawyers.com (5.0 of 5.0), AVVO (10 of 10) and other rating agencies. Amy L. Woodward, who recently joined the firm, is also building a reputation as a diligent, well-trained, insightful and hard-working personal injury attorney. Please contact Accident Lawyer Honolulu through our contact page if you wish to obtain a Free Consulation about your Serious Personal Injury claim. On a related note, if you share our passion for injury prevention and safety, you may wish to visit the Safety Next? blog here on this website to discuss the safety aspects of personal injury claims and how proactive efforts can help to prevent thousands of deaths and severe injuries each year in the U.S. alone.



Recent Personal Injury and Car Accident News

With proper foundation, the Hawaii courts recognize that a personal injury damage award should adequately compensate for actual losses sustained - past, present or future. "[D}ifficulties often arise in ascertaining... what sum will produce adequate compensation." The duty of juries in such cases is "to draw reasonable and probable inferences from the facts and circumstances in evidence and "to form, under proper instructions from the court, such reasonable and probable estimate, as in the exercise of good sense and sound judgment ... will produce adequate compensation." "There is no sound reason ... for throwing any part of the loss upon the injured party.". Coney v. Lihue Plantation Co., 39 Haw. 129 (1951)